The Hyatt Regency Walkway Collapse | A Short Documentary | Fascinating Horror



“On the 17th of July, 1981, more than 1,000 people were gathered in the atrium of the Hyatt Regency Kansas City Hotel for a tea dance, when a structural failure occurred…”

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CORRECTIONS:
► At one point in this video I use the word “psychic”. In fact, “psychological” would have been the more appropriate word to use in this context.

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45 Comments
  1. During my short time as an engineering student (Kids, don't go into engineering if your highest average grade is a c in math), we learned about this incident. basically took three days iirc going over what went wrong and how it could have been easily avoided. Shame people had to die for it to become a lesson though

  2. Jeez, this time it wasn’t even being cheap, it was just pure laziness

  3. Had they not held their stupid “tea” dances the floors would never had collapsed. It’s no different than a house built with a certain load of roof strength. Then calling 100 of your friends and neighbors to come stand on your roof. The walkways were designed for casual walking of guests. Not people packed shoulder to shoulder.

  4. J I'm so sorry for your loss

  5. It happens July 17, Hyatt baguio collapse during earthquake July 16 but not the same year, but coincidence

  6. I live in KC. I was 13 when this happened. I remember it well

  7. From the title, I could never have imagined the devastating loss of life. My heart goes out to all victims AND survivors ❤️❤️❤️

  8. We moved to KC area in 1998. I met a fire inspector who was a responder to the collapse. He spoke of the horror of having survivors that could not be rescued. He personally had held the hand of a lady while she slowly died from the weight of the debris. His face, telling his testimony, spoke volumes about the pain he suffered because of the experience. I can still see his face and the pain it reflected. May all those who died and those who suffered rest in peace and find peace. My deepest sympathies.

  9. What was the original design to support the 2nd floor walkway?

  10. I met a female architect whose family was sitting there underneath the walkways when the event happened. She lost her entire family before her eyes. When I met her she was just getting over the event some decades later. She and I both had PTSD and that is how we met

  11. I was 15 when this happened and remember exactly where I was when I heard of it. Only now seeing this do I realize the impact it had on me. Even though I was not there and only knew of those that were injured and killed. (My dentist was one of the last to succumb to injuries.) My husband could never understand why, when seated on the balcony overhang of the Midland in 2010 during a performance of “Stomp”, I almost hyperventilated. I can only imagine the effects on those who survived the actual event. As many have said below, we can only learn from a tragedy and do better going forward putting lives, not greed, first.

  12. I like your videos but I caught a slight factual error. At 2:50 you say the fourth floor walkway collapsed and fell to the second floor walkway which then failed. That couldn’t have been how it happened. Based on the engineering mistake, they had to fall together.

  13. I can’t remember what country, but whenever an engineer graduates they are given an iron ring, sometimes from metal involved in an accident of faulty work. The ring serves as a reminder that lives are at stake when designing anything. I think more places should have something like that.

  14. 8:18 "hundreds of deaths"? Wasn't it just above 100?

  15. This event was so horrific its still taught in engineering courses to this day.

  16. Sounds like a lot of the blame can be placed on the firm that said two rods would be sufficient. Like, sure, the engineers should have caught it, but if the people who designed the system say it's fine you should be able to take that at face value

  17. Very sad that so many good ppl just out for a evening of dining and dancing ended so tragically…. God bless everyone of those affected

  18. Yep.. Something terrible always needs to happen before things change

  19. Excellent recount of this disaster. Thank you

  20. i dont know if the triangle shirtwaist fire has been done, but id be interested in seeing a story about that. If its already done, im sure ill find it XD

  21. I did a case study on this. A slight engineering design flaw with the structural members that created double the force on the nuts holding up the walkway. We used this to recognize the importance of thoroughly running calculations on design changes requested by the contractors.

  22. "the psychic impact was huge"????

  23. I watched the local news coverage of this for about six hours on that night.

  24. I was in college when that happened. Still, looking at those walkways, just a hung platform and glass railings and the rods holding them up. Just a fright to walk on regardless of how stable they may or may not have been. Just too open my taste.

  25. They still use this case study today in 2022! Learned about this from my SO as he's going to school for architecture and he learned this today and I happened to hear this video on the same day. Thanks for making this!

  26. Buuuut the 1995 OK City bombing left more dead and wounded? And the St Francis Dam failure also killed a lot of people? Are you talking JUST buildings and things in them that failed due to construction fault? Not to belittle ANY loss of life, just trying to fit it all into my head.

  27. You should cover 9/11 NYC and the capital

  28. I don’t know why anyone would think hanger rods for a heavily-travelled walkway were a good idea.

  29. 6:09 Hope the people who proposed this idiotic idea rot in hell.

  30. Now that is bringing down the house if I ever seen one.

  31. A very sober story about Architecture, Buildings, and SAFETY! In 1978 at U.C. I almost became an Architecture student, having gotten out of Engineering, but things did not work out very well for me. but I appreciate this being presented to anyone, not just Students of Engineering, Architecture, and Design. There is nothing in the entire world of Knowledge and Application, in whatever specialty and vocational branch, as LEARNING FROM A MISTAKE. Should any plane or Jet be on total autopilot? Can any future Vehicle be its own DRIVER on the highway, and the old-fashioned Driver become only one of Its Passengers instead? even the Astronauts had to take over controls of their spacecraft to save a Mission. Remember Hal in 2001 A SPACE ODYSSEY: David Bowman had to completely dismantle HAL to just survive in further space missions. Methinks this very story of The Hyatt Regency ever looms in vaster importance in other areas than just a particular building's collapse. Its enduring LEGACY will be Its WARNING….

  32. Jack D. Gillum
    November 21, 1928 ~ July 4, 2012 (age 83)
    Obituary & Services
    Tribute Wall
    Obituary
    Jack was born on November 21, 1928 in Salina, Kansas. He passed on July 4, 2012 at age 83 at his home in Aurora, Colorado. He is survived by his wife, Judy, and five children, Jack Alan, Rick, Traci, Chuck, Chris and seventeen grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, Charles and Lillian, his brother, Charles, his first wife, Alice Reese, and his son, Timothy Dean. Jack graduated from the University of Kansas with a degree in Architectural Engineering. He was then drafted into the Army to serve in Korea from 1950 to 1952 as a First Lieutenant. Jack started his own structural engineering company, Jack D. Gillum and Associates in St. Louis, Missouri in the early sixties. During that time, his firm received many rewards and became one of the prominent engineering companies in the world including the design of the University of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia, and locally, Tabor Center in Denver. He was respected and admired by many in his profession. Jack was a devoted family man, spending many happy hours with his family and friends fly fishing, skiing and traveling the globe. He and his wife, Judy, celebrated their 39th wedding anniversary on June 1st. In lieu of flowers, the family is requesting that those who wish may donate to the Alzheimer's Association – Colorado Chapter, 455 Sherman Street, #500, Denver, Colorado 80203. A Memorial Service will be held on Tuesday, July 10, 2012 at 11:00am at Horan & McConaty Family Chapel, 5303 East County Line Road (one block west of South Holly Street) in Centennial, Colorado 80122. A Reception will follow at Horan & McConaty. Please share your memories of Jack and condolences with his family by signing the guestbook.

  33. When he said victims were at risk of drowning I literally said what the f** out loud

  34. I’ve stayed at that hotel before. My mom was in her 30s when this happened she lived just a few miles north in Avondale.

  35. People would be surprised on how rushed commercial construction projects still are. Corners are cut in every building built. It's crazy this doesn't happen more often.

  36. Lifetime Kansas city resident here. Thank you for covering this. The hotel still stands today, and going into the lobby is a very somber experience knowing what took place there.

  37. Real talk…there's no way that place isn't haunted.

  38. As a dumb union construction worker, i can say that these smart college kids do something like this atleast one time on every job ive been on, and its up to us to catch it…. someone should have very easily caught this 10 times over

  39. I was literally gonna email you this or comment it as a suggestion but when I looked up information I saw your video was already there lmao

  40. You'll never convince me there isn't footage of the actual collapse somewhere in a local TV station's vault…

  41. I remember when this happened. Can't believe it was that long ago.

  42. It seems that there was also a lack of redundancy. Simply doubling the load on a structure wouldn't normally cause a collapse unless they were originally designed to support a bare minimum.

  43. Wonder how many on the 4th floor walkway survived?

  44. The blood mixed with the flooding water must of been horrible sight.

  45. The subreddit writteninblood is perfect for this video

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